Status Pages

Last update: July 15, 2021

What's a Status Page?

Status pages allow you to quickly communicate information about the health of your services and applications to internal stakeholders and external customers.

This helps save time for team members who might be actively involved in responding to an incident, or customer support staff who need to direct end users to a centralized place for live updates about your organization.

It only takes about a minute to setup a status page, so we encourage you to do this soon after you've signed up.



Public and Private Status Pages

Rootly has two types of status pages available, public status pages and private status pages.

Private status pages quickly communicate relevant information about ongoing or past incidents and the status of incidents, services, functionalities, and teams. Each of these features in Rootly all automatically come with their own private status page built-in. Private status pages are typically only accessible from within your organization unless you decide to make them public.

Public status pages are similar to private ones, except that these are created on demand, and can be hosted at a custom domain name your company controls. Public status pages support services and functionalities.

Both types of status pages are customizable with your organization's logo and custom colors. You also have the ability to add custom links to the page for your company's main website, as well as custom privacy and customer support URLs.


Creating a Status Page

Creating a status page only takes about a minute. Before you do so, we recommend you have at least one service configured in Rootly that you can display on your status page. If you've configured the PagerDuty integration, you can easily import services directly from PagerDuty then add them to your status page.

To create a new status page, do the following:

In the Rootly navigation bar, click on Configuration, then Status Pages.


Next, click Add New Status Page.



On the configuration page, type a page name, and add a description if you'd like. Then click Attach Services and add the services you should have configured previously.



If you want the status page to be public, you will also need to add an external domain name, and ensure that it is set to Public.

Note that for custom external domain names, you may need to talk with the team at your organization to have them help you configure a custom domain name and associated DNS.



Configure any other options you'd like. Check and ensure that the page is set to Enabled, then click Create Status Page.



That's it! You've just created your first status page.



Incidents and Status Pages

Incidents are automatically published to their own private status page, as well as any services or functionality status pages with which they are associated.

You can see a specific incident status page by doing the following:

In the Rootly navigation bar, click Incidents, then Incidents again.



On the left side of the Incidents page, navigate to the specific incident you want and select it. Click the link near the top of the incident that will take you to that specific incident status page.



You will see something similar to the following:




Publishing Incidents to Public Status Pages

Incidents associated with services or functionalities attached to your public status page are not automatically published.

To publish an incident on a public status page, do the following:

In the Rootly navigation bar, click Incidents, then Incidents again.



On the left side of the Incidents page, navigate to the specific incident you want and select it. Locate Status Page Timeline, and select it, then click Publish.



A dialog will be presented for you to choose the appropriate status pages where you want the incident published.

This will also be your chance to add a useful title and description your external users can better understand. Add the appropriate information in the title and event fields.

Select a status for the incident, and then click Publish.



If you navigate back to your newly created incident page, you will now see the incident has been published.




Publishing Incidents to a Status Page Using Slack

In addition to using the web interface for publishing incidents to status pages, you can also accomplish the same thing without leaving Slack.

To publish an incident using Slack, do the following:

From Slack, navigate to the Slack channel specific to that incident, and type the command:

  • /rootly statuspage



A dialog will be presented for you to choose the appropriate status pages where you want the incident published.

This will also be your chance to add a useful title and description your external users can better understand. Add the appropriate information in the title and event fields.

Select a status for the incident, and then click Publish.


Custom Domain Names for Status Pages

You can also attach one or multiple custom domain names such as status.acme.me using the custom domain names input.

Once you save your page, you can obtain the CNAME target by clicking on the link for the status page you want to configure, as in the example below:



The CNAME can be found at the bottom of the screen, as shown here:



To configure the CNAME, you will need to either talk with the team or administrator at your company responsible for managing domain names and DNS, or configure it yourself if that person is you.

Since configuring DNS can vary wildly depending on your DNS service provider, we've provided links to a few of the most common services to help you get started.

Amazon Web Services Route 53

Azure DNS

Google Cloud Identity

GoDaddy Domains DNS